Articles Posted in Texas

Published on:

As those who experienced the Texas winter storm crisis are likely discovering, vital questions of coverage and recovery linger—and in some cases, first appear—long after the ice has melted and power has been restored. In “Texas Winter Storms: Evaluating Business Interruption Claims Following a Large-Scale Disaster,” Joseph D. Jean, and Tamara D. Bruno examine some of the challenging questions about business interruption insurance coverage raised in the aftermath of the storms.

Published on:

In another dramatic weather event, the recent severe winter conditions in Texas introduced unprecedented hardship for Texans and devastating damage for nearly every industry sector. In “Preparing Your Personal and Business Insurance Claims: Responding to the Texas Winter Storm Crisis,” Tamara D. Bruno, and Joseph D. Jean discuss the emerging insurance recovery, legal, commercial, regulatory and, in some respects, operational considerations that industries should be prepared to address in the wake of this Texas winter event.

Published on:

Seal_of_the_Supreme_Court_of_Texas-300x300In the uncertain times ushered in by the COVID-19 pandemic, observers of the insurance law landscape can find footing in an old, familiar story: a single insured left deeply dissatisfied by her insurance provider’s coverage for an accident lawsuit against her. But in In re: Farmers Texas County Mutual Insurance Co., a novel question of settlement authority offers the chance to make new law.

Continue Reading ›

Published on:

iStock-907906404-anadarko-300x200The Supreme Court of Texas delivered good news to policyholders insured under a “Joint Venture Provision” endorsement commonly used in the oil and gas industry. In Anadarko Petroleum Corp. v. Houston Casualty Co.—a case arising from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster—the court held that insurers assumed the obligation to reimburse the full amount of a joint venture partner’s defense costs, rejecting the insurers’ argument that their obligation was reduced by the “scaling” language of a Joint Venture Provision. As a result, the court held the insurers liable to Anadarko for over $100 million in defense costs, not just the $37.5 million they had already paid.

Continue Reading ›

Published on:

Texas is not a place known for surrendering. (Remember the Alamo!). But like their compatriots in other states, Texas policyholders sometimes see the advantage of surrendering their liability iStock-522384399-alamo-300x200insurance policy rights to their litigation adversaries in order to retreat from the dispute. Whether they may have to stand and fight first is a question that the Texas Supreme Court may finally answer in Great American Ins. Co. v. Hamel. In that case, the Texas Supreme Court has agreed to review whether an insurer may be responsible for a judgment entered against its insured that is the result of a non-adversarial trial. This will be an important decision that will have significant repercussions for insureds and insurers alike.

Continue Reading ›